Why to make sure your stove installer is HETAS approved

It may seem like a cheap and hassle free option to find a friend, a recommended tradesman or any trusty looking Joe Bloggs online, to install your wood burning stove. We get it, we all want to save money and time. But, sometimes in life, cutting corners can mean cutting down on your safety and potentially leaving your stove, your home and yourself in danger. With the wood burning stove industry growing in both size and popularity, more and more stoves are being installed across the country every year. However, this also means that the market for poor quality and even fraudulent installers is rising too. Each year, there are a number of incidents related to stoves, from blocked up chimneys, to massive explosions, many of which have resulted from stoves being installed incorrectly and poor or absent after-care.

 

That is why here at Calido Logs & Stoves, we recommend you always use a HETAS approved installer when fitting your stove. They’re fully trained and their main aim is to be as efficient as possible, rather than make money or get the job done quickly. HETAS is a not-for-profit organisation that approves biomass and solid fuel heating appliances, fuels and services, including the registration of competent installers and servicing businesses.

 

Bruce Allan, CEO of HETAS, says: “A stove is not a ‘one size fits all’ fashion accessory. It’s a heating appliance and…careful consideration needs to be taken to make sure it meets requirements and provides the right amount of heat to the property. Many consumers are unaware that failure to have an appliance correctly installed and maintained can have devastating consequences. Like any other fossil fuel appliance, wood burning and other solid fuel appliances can cause carbon monoxide poisoning or lead to a house fire if not installed and maintained correctly.”

 

HETAS strives to promote and monitor continuous improvement in the safe installation and use of solid fuel appliances, systems, chimneys & flues and in their maintenance. As a result, they are keen to be advised of any non-compliant installation carried out whether by a non-registered HETAS or registered HETAS engineer, and whether someone is claiming they are registered with HETAS, when they are not.

 

 

How to check your installer is HETAS approved

Here are 3 easy ways to check your installer is HETAs approved:

 

HETAS’ Objectives

  • Promote and monitor continuous improvement in the safe installation and use of solid fuel appliances, systems, chimneys & flues, and in their maintenance.
  • Encourage continual improvement of products and promote high standards of quality, design, safety and efficiency.
  • Lead the industry in updating & maintaining uniform standards of education & training at all levels to ensure safe and efficient installation and utilisation of solid fuels, systems & appliances.
  • Working with stakeholders to promote to the wider industry and its customers the means & benefits of achieving the safe and efficient use of solid fuels, the raising of standards & encouraging the provision of advice and guidance to solid fuel users.
  • Influence legislation, regulations & policies at national & international levels, that affect the use of solid fuel and solid fuel appliances, systems and related products and services.
  • Ensuring that HETAS is seen as offering an understandable and secure route through safety standards and relevant regulation in support of our organisational purpose.

 

Whether your wood burning stove is a regular part of your home life, or reserved for special occasions, it is important to check it is installed and maintained properly. This way, you help ensure that the stove has a long and healthy lease of life, and more importantly, you don’t have any nasty surprises. That is why it is important to be safe and legal and always be sure you’re using a HETAS approved installer.

You can access the HETAS website here.

Please note, that much of the information in this article and direct quotes come from the HETAS website.